Monday, 13 February 2012

Gone But Not Forgotten


The willow which sustained serious damage in the January winds was pruned on Saturday morning. Not so much a short back and sides but more of a full blown amputation. I did not watch whilst the work was in progress, so when I first saw it I had a shock, even though himself had explained what the procedure was going to involve. The tree surgeon was quick to respond to the "I want to cry but won't" look on my face by reassuring me that it will grow again. I will have to wait to see what spring brings so remain to be convinced. We have apologised profusely to the birds and insects who have graced its branches for many years and when the wind blows this week will miss the distinct sound of its branches creaking back and forth.

9 comments:

  1. Anna - I had a good cry when we had to prune our willow last year. Although yours had to be pruned more severely your tree surgeon is right, it will come back and you will hear the Wind in the Willows again
    K

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  2. It does look severe, Anna, but rest assured that it will grow back, and sooner than you think. It won't take long.

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  3. I sympathise. I couldn't watch when we had our silver birch removed. The sound of the stump grinder was awful. A beautiful tree that had been there for 7 years removed in an hour. The previous owners had planted it too close to the house and we only have a small garden and it was just too big. I felt really guilty for the birds. We used to hang feeders in it. I still miss the tree. Willows are tough plants and I'm sure it will be fine once Spring comes. Best wishes x

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  4. Anna, I'm sure you'll be amazed at how quickly they grow back. We had some tree surgeons give our strawberry tree a severe cut back 2 years ago. I actually stopped them halfway through - they were taking it down so far as I thought they were intending to remove it entirely! It shot back into life the following spring and now we have lovely foliage - and at a height that we can easily cut back when it starts shading out next door's patio.

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  5. I know nothing about trees but the comments above me sound positive. I also suspect that as long as the roots are healthy your loved Willow will find ways to send out new branches. You will be blogging in the summer about how well it is doing! xx

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  6. We had ours pollarded a few years ago and within weeks there were little sprouts popping out everywhere - and now it could do with being cut back again.

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  7. Anna a few years back our neighbours felled a large leylandii - I know it had to go - it had grown so big - but I stlii feel sick when I think about it - the birds missed it - but then soon made other arrangements and other trees and shrubs have grown to replace it - your willow will soon bounce back - Jane x

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  8. There is something so miserable about drastic tree pruning, isn't there, even when you know it is the Right Thing To Do. A bit of mourning seems appropriate, but I'm sure in six months time you will be feeling a lot more cheery about it, and the tree will have a chance at a much longer life because of it.

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  9. I know willows are very fast growing, though... I can't imagine it from what's left either, though a tree surgeon should know! Looking forward to seeing photos of the tree later in spring!

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any
specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.