Monday, 21 April 2014

A Moving Story


Despite the title of this post there's no need to have a box of tissues to hand. Back in February with some trepidation on my behalf, we relocated a couple of pear trees moving them about twenty feet. The first of the pears concerned is 'Doyenne du Comice' which was planted some time in the autumn of 2011. Somebody did not do their research thoroughly at the time so did not release that a pollinating partner was required. This glaring error was rectified in the spring of 2012 when I came across a pear tree in the 'bargain basement' of a local garden centre. It was not the sturdiest of specimens but I felt sorry for it and bought it home as a companion for the 'Doyenne'. I think that it's a 'Concorde' tree - I say think as the label long disappeared into obscurity. It was duly planted in close proximity to the first pear.
Last spring I waited with bated breath for both to flower. They both did but not at the same time - the 'Doyenne' flowering well ahead of the newer arrival. A few pear like growths appeared on the 'Doyenne' but amounted to nothing. This year's wait was a more than just a case of bated breath as I wondered whether the trees had survived being uprooted and planted in a new dwelling place. Well I'm delighted to report that a) both are alive and kicking and b) that they are both flowering at exactly the same time albeit the 'Concorde' is only bearing a cluster or two of flowers. I am now waiting to see whether blossom will morph into pear this year. From what I've read it appears that it can sometimes be a few years wait before this happens but the odds must certainly be improved if the two companions are in flower in tandem. Whatever happens the 'Doyenne' has looked a picture this spring and though not a cherry as in A.E. Houseman's poem she has most certainly been 'wearing white for Eastertide'.


In other seasonal news there has been much activity on the allotment plot over the last few days perhaps too much as my body is protesting. The potatoes have gone in, broad beans and peas have been planted shallots have been transplanted into the ground and there has been much tidying up and weeding. I've spent some time in the greenhouse and I've also been thinking about the forthcoming annual plant sale at my gardening club. I have a stall there most years. The plants earmarked for the occasion unfortunately look as if they are going to be flowering well ahead of schedule, so I'm now having a mild panic thinking of what I will be able to take on the day. Himself has suggested putting them into the garage to delay flowering but somehow I don't think that this technique would be used by the exhibitors at the Chelsea Flower Show. What a challenge they must be facing this forward spring after last year's extremely backward's spring. Heading off back into the garden to ponder this dilemma over in more depth ..... What gardening activities have you been up to this Easter?

22 comments:

  1. I'm waiting with bated breath to see if any fruit appears on any of my trees this year, I've got a few very young ones which haven't fruited before so I'm hoping that this may be the year. It sounds like you've had a busy Easter on the plot. Unfortunately, I've had a bit of a busy weekend doing other things, start of the cricket season, moving Daniel back to uni yesterday, but I've managed a bit of gardening today.

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  2. Sounds like you've had a brilliantly productive weekend!
    We have been in destruction mode again, winching out overgrown shrubs. It'll look like a building site rather than a garden at this rate.

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    1. It was a good weekend Jessica although a bit of a blur now. Hope that you're getting there albeit progress may seem slow at times. I know the feeling all too well :)

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  3. I was thrilled to see lots of blossom on our conference pear tree, planted last autumn, though I am not expecting pears. Very glad the move was successful and that your two seem to be being more friendly. Maybe its like women who live together syncing their cycles?! I am aching too, lots of pruning and weeding, hoping to get more peas and broad beans in tomorrow. Good luck stalling your plants, maybe some harsh words? Or begging?

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    1. I had to chuckle at your comment Janet :) Hope that the aching is a thing of the past or if you are still suffering you've probably got immune to it by now. Harsh words and begging are not having the desired effect!

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  4. My pear tree has been in the garden for about ten years - last year for the first time I had a few fledgling pears but they all dropped off - will I ever taste a pear from my own tree in my lifetime - I am beginning to wonder. The upside is that pear blossom is beautiful.

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    1. Oh your comment has got me slightly worried Elaine but as you say the blossom is beautiful. I will just have to be patient.

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  5. The Pear blossom is beautiful. I hope you get some pears, but isn't there a saying about planting pears for your heirs? It's probably an old wives' tale like the one about beating a walnut tree.
    It's a busy time in the garden and I expect we are all in dig until you drop mode.

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    1. Now I don't particularly like the sound of that saying Chloris as especially having no heirs we want our pears here and now. Perhaps we are being to greedy. If I had heard the saying before planting I might have resisted :)

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  6. Your pear blossom is gorgeous, I really hope you get some pears this year. I also have two pear trees, just Minarette ones, but even so, they usually produce a few pears for me. This year though, only one is flowering at the moment, I will have to wait and see if any pears develop!

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    1. We will have to compare notes later this year Pauline :)

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  7. Great that your pears survived their move, don't theyhave exact pollinating partners like apples? The season can definately effect the flowering season, I have two crab apples which usually flower at the same time but not this year. Your blossom is very pretty anyway.

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    1. Thanks for your comment Christina. You're quite right. I think that the planting partners for my pear were Concorde and Conference and I planted one or t'other :) I'm hoping that my newly planted crab apple in close proximity to the pears will join them in blossoming next year.

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  8. Lovely post, Anna! So glad your pear survived the move. I had to move our Mirabelle de Nancy this spring and it was no problem. Plants are more forgiving than we think. Jays are a big problem in our orchard, always picking the fruit. I've planted lots of tomatoes, chilli, aubergines...exciting varieties, so I look forward to eating them (no jays in the potager and greenhouse thank God!) :)

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    1. We have jays visit too Annette but fortunately they do not seem to find their way to the front garden where the pears are planted. May that state of affairs continue. It sounds as if your greenhouse is full of much to look forward to.

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  9. I love pear blossom, and we have lots of wild pears on the hills around us, just going over. I looked them up and was astonishd to discover they are Amelanchier or Serviceberry - both names I have seen on various blogs, but I never made the connection! I hope you get a few pears this year Anna. :D

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    1. Oh how lucky you are too have such beautiful trees in the neighbourhood Cathy. Amelanchiers are glorious not only in spring but in the autumn too.

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  10. Hope you get some pears Anna! I was interested to hear about your Concorde as I have had one as a 'pillar' for 2 years but there is no sign of any blossom yet; they are meant to be self-fertile so mine doesn't need a pearfriend once it does produce flowers.

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    1. Oh Cathy I wonder how long you will have to wait for blossom. Hope that yours gets a move on!

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  11. Hopefully you'll have some pears this autumn. That would be amazing. Pears and plums are on my list if we have space in our next garden so I'll be interested to follow your pear progress. ;) It is a frantic time of year. I'm just about managing to keep up with everything. Your bit about trying to hold back the plants made me smile. I sympathise as I spent much of last year trying to do that and find myself doing it again. I somehow don't imagine Chelsea growers using their downstairs toilet to keep flowers cool. ;) That's the room, I'm not actually plunging them down the toilet pan. ;0 Good luck with the plant sale.

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    1. I will keep my fingers crossed that you have the room in your next garden for your fruit tree wish list Louise. The downstairs loo sounds a novel approach and you never know what goes behind the scenes as far as the Chelsea growers are concerned ...

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.