greentapestry : In A Vase On Monday ~ Allotment Meets Garden

Monday, 29 September 2014

In A Vase On Monday ~ Allotment Meets Garden


Allotment and garden came together to create this week's little vase. From the allotment the violet blue daisy flowers of aster 'Little Carlow'. I know that asters have had a recent name change but I haven't got a hang of it yet and it will probably take me some to do so. 'Little Carlow' produces clouds of tiny flowers which are a bee and butterfly magnet. It's quite a tall plant reaching about three feet. I have some divisions from this waiting to work their magic in the garden.


From the garden the bright yellow daisies of 'The Yellow Peril' which I've posted about before. It has defied my attempts to kill it off. There's an uneasy truce between us but for now it sits in a corner where it's thuggish habits are carefully monitored. Any spreading growth is yanked out as soon as I see it. I must admit that I've become fonder of it over the years and now welcome the late colour it provides. It came as a nameless division from a gardening club friend. I think that it's a helianthus but I'm clueless as to which one.

Finally tucked in to the vase a couple of sprigs from my new salvia 'Amistad'. Pottering in the greenhouse yesterday I gently tugged at the cuttings that I took earlier this month. I was so excited by being met with resistance.

The vase is the reverse side of my stoneware cider jug.

You can enjoy a host of other vases over at 'Rambling In The Garden' - thanks as always to Cathy for providing a virtual mantlepiece each week for us to showcase our vases.

34 comments:

  1. Nice on Anna. As your Helianthus is such a thug, it looks like you've found a neat way of keeping it under control. Seeing 'Little Carlow' always makes me smile because it's not so little.

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    1. 'Little' is a bit of misnomer in some ways VP :) I've decided that part of the name must refer to the tiny flowers.

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  2. So pretty. The simple arrangements are usually the most striking.

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    1. Thanks for your comment Jo. I'm with you on your comments about simple arrangements :)

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  3. A lovely combo! I have some thugs similar to your nameless Helianthus--it's hard to pull them when they have such cheery faces.

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    1. Could not agree with you more Rose - they look so happy in flower so it seems mean to be thinning them out at that stage.

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  4. Very pretty, love the combination of the violet blue and the yellow.

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    1. Thanks Ronnie - it's one of my favourite colour ways.

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  5. A lovely colour combination Anna. I have Little Carlow too and I absolutely love it. Well done getting the lovely shot of the comma on it. I also have something which looks very like your Yellow Peril, it is very invasive but it is pretty at this time of the year.

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    1. The comma so obligingly landed on the flowers Chloris. The photo was taken either last year or the year before. It was so fortunate that it was on one of the occasions when I had taken my camera to the allotment with me.

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  6. That works really well, doesn't it? And worth tightly controlling the thug to give you some blooms for a vase or two :) Glad your cuttings are doing well

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    1. Thanks Cathy. Yes the 'Yellow Peril' may have had a further reprieve as potential vase fodder :)

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  7. My favorite color combination, Anna. I love the butterfly pic too.

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment Kris :)

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  8. Your yellow peril looks exactly like Jerusalem artichokes, I wrote about them a couple of Monday's ago if you want to compare. You could always dig lots of them up and eat them! They'll still caome back the following year, impossible to eradicate once you've planted them. Lovely and long lasting in a vase. Last week's little vases were still looking OK yesterday.

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    1. Hi Christina. I've noticed that the flower does indeed look similar to Jerusalem artichoke flowers but remained to be convinced as I've never come across any tubers .... perhaps I will have to delve deeper. Still the flowers are pleasant enough in a vase.

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  9. I keep my helianthus in a very "difficult" spot - this means that its thuggish behaviour is (slightly) kept in check - but when it flowers, well then all is forgiven as it really lights up the garden at this time of year. Little Carlow is pretty, I am still coming to terms with having asters in the garden!
    K
    xx

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    1. I like the "Treat 'em mean, keep 'em keen" approach Karen. Asters - what's not to like? I can see them fitting in well into your borders.

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  10. Lovely! Your photos show off these flowers so well. I have that Helianthus too, but it struggles to spread in the absolute driest and hottest spot in the rockery. (It doesn't flower well, but is one of the few plants to remain green even when we have drought for weeks!) In my last garden it was a different story and I ended up digging up a whole flower bed and removing every single piece of root I could find... worth the efforrt in the long run...

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    1. Thanks Cathy. Your experience in your last garden sounds an absolute nightmare - I'm surprised that you gave helianthus another chance :)

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  11. Anna we must have been thinking the same thoughts for our vases...i too used purple asters (I won't use the new name) and helianthus...I love the use of your salvia.

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    1. I will not be using that new name either Donna :)

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  12. Lovely summery feel to your vase today - those asters are so pretty and I think I have that helianthus. I regarded it as a weed and have tried unsuccessfully to eradicate it from the border, but this year my views have softened - I think it looks quite pretty now and it certainly fills an awkward space.

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    1. I used to harbour malicious intents with regard to that helianthus but my attitude has softened over time. It obviously wants to stay so I'm humouring it :)

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  13. Delightful - I love the colour of the asters which I call Michaelmas Daisies - I planted some last year but they disappeared never to return

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    1. Oh Elaine - what a shame - hope that you replace them in the future and that they thrive. They are simply brilliant at this time of year.

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    1. Thanks for visiting Sussi and for your comment.

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  15. Three cheers for cuttings resistance! Yellow Peril looks just like my helianthuss 'Lemon Queen', which, still young, is still too charming to regret having planted... I should try picking some aster flowers too, I do so love them.

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    1. I had another gentle tug today Janet and they are still hanging on in there. I've heard nothing but good about 'Lemon Queen' so I don't think you need to have any worrries.

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  16. Apologies to Jessica (Rusty Duck) - I accidentally deleted your comment when replying to it. Jessica wrote "Well done on the salvia cuttings. I must do mine, hope it's not too late.. "

    I hope that your cuttings are done and dusted under cover now Jessica. Will be keeping my fingers crossed that they root for you.

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  17. Love the colour combination. I really think bringing a few flowers in from the garden allows us to appreciate them more. Hope you have a lovely weekend.

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.