Tuesday, 7 October 2014

Tree Following With Lucy ~ October 2014


Some real wildlife action this month - if you look very closely you might be able to spot the pigeon lurking in the branches. It was conveniently waiting for me when I ventured out to take a photo between yesterday's dramatic cloudbursts. I only wish that it could have been less camera shy as it had its back turned to the camera.

There's really not much in the way discernible difference in my willow's appearance from September's post. The weather has been so kind so I think that it has just been basking in the sunshine and stretching out its branches in content. Something has changed though and for a few minutes I was hard pressed to pinpoint what it is. The penny eventually dropped as I decided that the foliage is gently fading as well as thinning out. Nothing dramatic but a slow slip-sliding into its quieter time of the year. I'm wondering what changes the next month will bring.

For more monthly tree updates do have a peek at Loose and Leafy. With special thanks as always to Lucy for hosting this excellent opportunity to share both information and some fabulous photos on the subjects of trees.

27 comments:

  1. It will be interesting to see the photos over the next couple of months as the tree drops its leaves and we get to see its actual shape again.

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    1. I had another look at the willow this morning Jo and the underlying structure is certainly more in evidence than it was in September. Maybe that's why I could see the pigeon :)

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  2. Change might look more dramatic next month when leaves have mostly fallen. Willows are such beautiful trees.

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    1. It will be interesting to see just how many leaves are hanging on next month. They are indeed beautiul trees guys.

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  3. I am interested to find that there has not been much obvious change as this has been the case with my Silver Birch here still has most of its leaves ... but after this gusty weather, things may change ...(unlike a different birch in my area).

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment Caroline. Will have a peek at your silver birch later :)

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  4. My ash tree's doing exactly the same Anna. though I think our posts will be very different next month!

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    1. I imagine that indeed will be the case VP :)

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  5. My tree is finally shifting but slower than I would expect...October will bring big changes here.

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    1. A slow winding down though is preferable I think Donna. It will be fascinating to see what transpires over the next month.

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  6. I'm betting that next month all branches will be bare.

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment Helen. If I was a gambler I would bet on their being some leaves still hanging on in there :) We shall see .....

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  7. It's interesting how some trees fade away while others drop leaves in a blaze of glory. With your white fluff earlier in the year - maybe spring is when Ash trees have their moments of drama.

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    1. Yes it seems to be a case of one or t'other Lucy/ I think that I prefer that blaze of glory. I think that the fluff is the willow's piece de resistance and one that is viewed more favourably a good time after the event rather than during :)

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  8. You' ll probably see the real difference next month when all the leaves will have faded away like silver ghosts. The tree still looks lovely.

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    1. Oh I like the image of 'silver ghost' Chloris. It's most apt for the willow :)

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  9. Your tree still looks stunning, as for my apple tree, the leaves are tuning brown and the apples on the floor are well rotten..
    Amanda

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    1. Oh no Amanda - I'm sure that it can't be as bad a picture as you paint ! Will have a peek later.

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  10. not really related, but I've been wanting to ask ... what is an Allotment? I don't think we have them in Wyoming and maybe not in the USA.

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    1. An excellent question Hollis and thanks for asking. Now how do I begin to answer that? :) I'm going to quote the National Allotment Society's words - "An allotment is an area of land, leased either from a private or local authority landlord, for the use of growing fruit and vegetables. In some cases this land will also be used for the growing of ornamental plants, and the keeping of hens, rabbits and bees" and to give you some idea of the origins of allotments "The system we recognise today has its roots in the Nineteenth Century, when land was given over to the labouring poor for the provision of food growing. This measure was desperately needed thanks to the rapid industrialisation of the country and the lack of a welfare state. In 1908 the Small Holdings and Allotments Act came into force, placing a duty on local authorities to provide sufficient allotments, according to demand. However it wasn’t until the end of the First World War that land was made available to all, primarily as a way of assisting returning service men instead of just the labouring poor". Hope this helps. I pay the local council an annual rent for my allotment which is situated about two miles from where I live. I think that nearest equivalent to allotments in the USA is what you call community gardens.

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    2. Thanks, Anna, for the interesting explanation. It's nice to hear that there are systems like these! We do have a communal garden in one of our town parks here.

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  11. Love that slow slip-sliding analogy, Anna! This week will see big changes with the rain and the drop in temperature - but you have had sun and blue skies in between, I see, as we have ps availed myself of two 'different' amaryllis (and no milk - wine instead!) from Lidl this morning - thanks for the alert!

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    1. Thanks Cathy - the credit belongs to Paul Simon. The weather has been rather up and down this week but we certainly needed the rain - not so sure about the cooler temperatures though especially as our boiler has packed in :( Oh I'm glad to read that you bought amaryllis and wine - an excellent combination methinks. I was tempted by 'Luna'. I wonder what caught your eye.

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  12. Autumn has slowed down here, and there has also been little change over the past weeks. Hope it stays mild and the leaves don't drop too fast!

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  13. I think my hawthorn is slip sliding away too, and thank you for the ear worm!! A camera-shy pigeon is certainly something of note, they are usually aggressively "look at me"ish, I find...

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  14. lovely tree - starting to take some photos of trees around here - can't wait to join in!

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.