greentapestry : Garden Bloggers Bloom Day ~ April 2015

Wednesday, 15 April 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day ~ April 2015


It's the turn of a pea and a cabbage to star in this month's GBBD post. The spring pea or lathyrus vernus grows quite happily in lightly dappled shade. Mine is planted in the gabion border with hellebores and pulmonarias for company. This plant has a bushy habit unlike the summer flowering climbing/scrabbling sweet pea but it sadly lacks the scent of the latter. It seems easy going and does not seem to suffer from any damage by pests. It's the colours of the flowers that I find its most attractive feature. There's also a pink version namely lathyrus vernus 'Alboroseus' but this one is my favourite. Both can be grown from seed although I always seem to miss gathering seeds before they have silently shot off into the stratsosphere.






The cabbage in question is a cardamine which has only taken up residence very recently. Cardamines are a member of the brassicaceae family which includes those good for you edibles such as cabbage, brussel sprouts and broccoli. I came across it at a plant fair under the name of cardamine enneaphyllos but having since done some research the jury is out on this one. The flowers of that particular plant are described as creamy whilst the plant I have come home with has most definitely got white flowers. I was advised that it prefers a moist shady spot and is not in the least bit fussy. I know that some cardamines can be invasive so I am going to have keep my eyes on in at least until I can establish what it is.


April is such an exciting time of the year in the garden with new flowers seemingly opening when you have turned your back just for five minutes. I'm still looking for more April colour, so will no doubt gain inspiration as usual, when I visit May Dreams Gardens later to see what other bloggers are highlighting today. With many thanks to Carol without whom we would not have a Garden Bloggers Bloom Day.

36 comments:

  1. I'm not familiar with the spring pea but I love the colours, it reminds me of petrol in a puddle. How wonderful that there's a plant which isn't attractive to pests, I think we need to celebrate that, they're few and far between.

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    1. What an apt comparison Jo! The flowers do have a most attractive luminescent quality about them. As you suggest pest free plants are hard to beat - we could do with more of them.

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  2. Your lathyrus vernus is especially pretty and new to me. What beautiful rich colors! Happy GBBD!

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment. It is indeed a most pretty plant.

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  3. Some of the most attractive Peas and Cabbage I have seen. The lathyrus has wonderful colours.

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    1. Just as well that they are not edible Brian as they probably would never get as far as the flowering stage :)

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  4. I don't know if your Lathyrus is what we call 'perennial pea' but it is lovely despite the lack of fragrance fo the later peas.

    This is a fun post. Happy Bloom Day.

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    1. Thanks Jean. I think that the perennial pea may be lathyrus latifolius but I could be wrong :) If only this plant had scent it would be perfect .

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  5. The Pea is absolutely gorgeous!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment Lea :)

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  6. Nice duo but particularly taken with the spring pea with its lovely hues!

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    1. I think that the spring pea is probably my favourite of the duo too.

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  7. Loved Jo's description of petrol in a puddle, I can see just what she means! It's beautiful though..

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    1. Yes Jessica it's a brilliant description isn't it :)

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  8. Things are certainly on the move now and I get garden centres are full of temptation,

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    1. I imagine that they are Sue but I've only had two garden centre trips so far this year. I usually get most of my new plants from nurseries, plant fairs and our local country market. Garden centre trips usually involve bringing compost rather than plants home :)

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  9. Ooh, lovely spring peas! And I like the cardamine - can kind of see the resemblance in the flowers to brassicas.

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    1. Oh welcome Erica! Thanks for for your visit and comment :)

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  10. Your pea is similar to the ones that grow in the banks by the roads here, the colour is fabulous and definitely better than the pink.

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    1. It is similar to the plants commonly known as vetches which grow on verges over here too Christina but lathyrus vernus is a sturdier plant.

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  11. I have this Lathyrus too but mine doesn' t have the turquoise touches to the petals, it' s gorgeous. Lovely Cardamine too.

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    1. The turquoise shades seem to appear as the flowers age Chloris. The flowers are a uniform purple I think when they first open.

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  12. I love to see the wild pea flowers in spring... we will need a couple more weeks here though before they appear. Although, as you say, everything seems to be happening so quickly this month I shall probably find one blooming tomorrow! I have never thought of growing them as they are a bit of a weed here.

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    1. I wonder if the plants that you are referring to Cathy are vetches which often can be seen on roadside verges over here. I can't recall the Latin name at the moment.

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  13. Just adore your Spring Pea flowers. They are beautiful.

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment Bernie :)

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  14. I have a spring pea and was not sure what it was....I love it! So glad now I know what this little plant is...

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    1. Oh glad to be of assistance Donna although I'm sure that you still loved it when it was nameless :)

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  15. I have never come across this 'spring pea' before - is it a perennnial? If so it would be a useful thing to have - must look it up as it is very pretty

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    1. It is indeed perennial Cathy. If I manage to collect seeds I can arrange for some to wing their way to you.

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  16. I have 2 perennial peas, I wonder if they are the same as yours? They have pretty flowers but no perfume and they don't grow very tall either.

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    1. They could well be related Pauline :)

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  17. I've not come across Cardamines before, but that one is very attractive - you don't think of cabbages as having pretty, dainty flowers, do you?!

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    1. I now have two cardamines Juliet. They are not showy plants but are most pretty in a quiet way. Brassica flowers are quite appealing although they are a bright yellow :)

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  18. I've never seen either of these here in Virginia. They're both beautiful! I do have the regular, fragrant sweet peas growing but they haven't bloomed yet. But once our summer heat hits, they'll start to fry and I'll need to pull them. I love the color of y our pea flowers.

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  19. Closest I get to peas is the wild vetch which pops ups at this time of year - very pretty it is too. I'm contemplating trying sweet peas next year, it's entirely your fault as I was really taken with 'matacuna' which you grow.

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.