greentapestry : IAVOM ~ Shimmer

Monday, 22 June 2020

IAVOM ~ Shimmer



Today's occupants in 'In A Vase on Monday' were a quick snatch and grab from my allotment plot yesterday but were not photographed until this morning. I've noticed that wind seems to be a regular feature of the weather on Mondays. Although today is rather breezy as opposed to windy the contents of my vase just refused to stand to attention.

In this week's vase are :
A prickly stem of dispascus fullonom commonly known as teasel and one of the biggest mistakes of my allotment life. I planted it more for the birds and pollinators than me and have regretted that decision. They self seed profusely and although I always intend to get on top of the problem I have never succeeded. The plants are unbearably uncomfortable to get hold of without gloves and seedlings are difficult to remove. Still I enjoy them in a perverse way. There is something quite splendid about their architecture and the hollows above their leaves which hold pools of water after rain. You can just see the first flush of colour which is creeping into the flowers now.

  • Secondly are the purple flowers of verbena bonariensis - these again have self-seeded over the years but never enough to irritate. Some years plants over winter but when they don't there are invariably replacement seedlings. The mauve scented flowers attract butterflies. 
  • Lastly one of my all time favourite plants - some stems from stipa gigantea also known as the golden oat grass, which garden writer Val Bourne describes so eloquently as "The tall shimmering golden veil of summer, for a hot spot in sun, where it hovers over the garden constantly moving and shining until autumn". It is a real beauty and my plant is looking particularly good this year.
The vase is a favourite stalwart given to me by mum. Unfortunately I don't know anything about its origins and must make a note to ask my sister if she does.

As always a big thank you to our lovely hostess Cathy who blogs at 'Rambling In The Garden' for enabling us to share our vases every Monday. It's a great way to celebrate the start of a new week. 

18 comments:

  1. Yes, I always admire teasels on boggy verges but have resisted the temptation to bring seed home with me, although I have brought the heads back for decorative purposes I suppose. Your stipa is beautiful but needs the right place to set it off - is yours at the allotment or in the garden? It makes me want to reach out and stroke the contents of your vase, even the teasels, as the verbena is the perfect cmpanion for the others. Thanks for sharing Anna

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    1. I'm to hear that you have resisted all temptation Cathy πŸ˜„ The stipa is at the allotment. It does rather invite you to stroke it.

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  2. What a beautiful understated collection! I love it! I am great fan of teasels, and of course the goldfinches love them too. In the autumn you will be very popular! My verbena bonariensis is a bit disappointing this year. Not sure why. It is such a fabulous plant. I love anything airy, so the combination of the verbena and your beautiful grasses is all just wonderful! Thank you. Amanda https://therunningwave.blogspot.com/2020/06/another-wild-bunch-in-vase-on-monday.html

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    1. Thanks Amanda. I like to think that the teasels are appreciated by the birds but just wish that they would eat up all the seeds. Yes verbena bonariensis is rather unique. Sorry to hear that yours is a bit of a let down this year.

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  3. What a great title for your vase, which is so original. I mean that in a positive way. At this stage the teasels almost look velvety. A tease for when they turn into teasels proper. I've seen frames set with rows of these ready to create the fluffiness on woven wool.

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    1. Thanks Noelle. I knew that they could be used to tease out knots but didn't know that they could be used to create fluffiness. Aren't plants amazing?

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  4. Your Stipa is so pretty and looks lovely in a vase. I love teasels too, but after allowing a couple to settle in my old garden I also soon realised my mistake when they started to multiply! I managed to eradicate them just in time!

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    1. Saved in the nick of time.That was most fortunate indeed Cathy!πŸ˜‚

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  5. We grew teasel once but never again- they popped up everywhere.

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  6. I can understand your love-hate relationship with the teasel, Anna. It makes a very attractive feature in a vase. Is there any way to prevent it from taking over other than banning it altogether?

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    1. It's a fine plant Kris. The only way to prevent if from world domination is to cut the flower head off as soon as the flower is done and dusted. However that act would defeat the purpose of growing them for the birds to feed on the seeds during the winter. A bit of a dilemma really.

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  7. The teasel may be problematic for you, but there's no getting away from the fact that it's rather lovely. Your vase arrangment is beautiful in its simplicity. I love the airy look that the stipa gives.

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment Catherine. The teasel is indeed a rather lovely plant non withstanding it's bad habits πŸ˜‚

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  8. Hi Anna, I do love this arrangement. Very nice. I get your self seeding problem with the teasel but I have to admit I do love its flower especially when bees flock to it. I have loved verbena bon too, again enjoying seeing butterflies especially on it. I've been a fan of the oat grass. Strangely, after reading other comments, my teasel didn't self seed after I had removed it. Unfortunately nor has verbena bon, sadly it isn't hardy here and I've stopped trying different varieties. Wishing you a good week :-)

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    1. Oh you have had a most lucky escape indeed Shirl with no self seeding from either the teasel or the verbena πŸ˜‚ The verbena doesn't aways get through the winter here but seedlings invariably appear.

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  9. So you managed to get into your allotment this week. I agree Stipa gigantea does shimmer in the sunlight. I love it.

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    1. Well deduced Sherlock πŸ˜„ A temporary problem I'm glad to say. I love the stipa too but especially on a sunny day.

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

NamastΓ©

- Anna.