Sunday, 15 February 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day ~ February 2015


"You can't say that you can't grow a plant until you have killed it at least three times" was a memorable maxim from a formidable plantswoman Thelma Kay, who spoke at a Hardy Plant Society meeting I attended many moons ago. Thelma managed to cajole many tender plants to grow in her north Manchester garden and no doubt had more than a few casualties on the way. So as it's February, peak time for snowdrops, here are a couple more, both of which have recently returned to the fold for a second attempt.

Above is galanthus 'Cowhouse Green' which apparently can be miffy and difficult to establish. There are conflicting stories about its origin including one that the bulb was found near a cowhouse hence the name. Would it have withstood the heavy trampling of hooves if that was so? Still it's a most appealing tale. I'm not sure how long my first 'Cowhouse Green' survived but think it was a couple of years. In that short period of time it became one of my favourites.


The second which you can see above is galanthus plicatus 'Trym', which I know I had as long ago as 2009 possibly before. It was one of the casualties of the cold 2010/2011 winter and I've hankered for a replacement since. My potted collection of snowdrops was outside that year rather than under cover which resulted in major losses and much wailing from me. Now I bring them in to the greenhouse for the colder months of the year, although they will have to be turfed out soon so seed sowing can commence in earnest. You can see that 'Trym' has decidedly different shaped petals to most other snowdrops. It has been a significant breeding plant because of this feature.

Both replacement bulbs came as dormant bulbs last summer from Avon Bulbs. Fingers crossed that I will be able to feature them again this time next year. If not they will be on their final warning!

Thanks as always to Carol over at May Dreams Gardens who kindly hosts this monthly meme, so we can share what's blooming in our gardens or in my case this month in my greenhouse. 

40 comments:

  1. Cowhouse Green is my favourite of the two. It's really appealing when a plant comes with a story, isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's my favourite too Jo although the shape of 'Trym' is most appealing. I love the stories behind the names, not just snowdrops but all plants.

      Delete
  2. Beautiful!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for visiting Lea and for your comment :)

      Delete
  3. I am not a snowdrop collector, so I am amazed that you remember all the different names of yours. But I do see the difference in these two. I must say that I am partial to 'Trym,' though I like the history behind 'Cowhouse.' Happy Bloom Day, Anna!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suppose it's like anything else that you collect and have an interest in Rose - you tend to remember the names. Also because they are all in pots I also have labels to act as aide memoires :)

      Delete
  4. I just have basic common snowdrops in my garden which I love, but that 2nd one of yours is very unusual and I do rather like it :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the so called 'common' snowdrops too Su every bit as much as the named ones. Yes Trym is definitely unusual which is part of the attraction.

      Delete
  5. Trym is so unusual - I just have the bog standard ones which are only just appearing way behind everyone else, I do have a pot on the windowsill too and even they are only just flowering. I obviously don't have the special Snowdrop touch that you have.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think that I have a special snowdrop touch Elaine but thanks anyway for such a nice compliment :) Perhaps yours are in a exposed situation in the garden hence the apparent delay. It's good to have them in the kitchen though, not only to peruse them close up, but to enjoy their scent too which should be apparent in a warm spot.

      Delete
  6. I must be careful, or I could become a snowdrop collector. I like 'Cowhouse Green'. Thanks for sharing it for bloom day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your kind words Carol and for enabling me to share them via GBBD :)

      Delete
  7. Trym is definitely different - we just have the standard types so no anxious moment other than accidentally dogging them up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes 'Trym' definitely stands out from the crowd Sue. It's always disconcerting isn't it when you dig up bulbs and so easily done when the foliage is done and dusted. I always feel most guilty when it happens.

      Delete
  8. Killing a plant 3 times... ? That shows how optimistic we gardeners are, doesn't it? I have had my Cowhouse Green for only a year but it is still alive although hasn't opened. Trym was on my Avon list but was out of stock and therefore saved me a few pennies ;) Thanks for sharing your lovely photos, Anna

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope that your 'Cowhouse Green' is open now Cathy. Remember mine is under cover and had only just opened a couple of days or so before the photo was taken. What a shame that 'Trym' was already out of stock. They went quickly considering how early you ordered. Next time hopefully!

      Delete
  9. Thought of you today Anna, spotted an Anna's Red in a nearby garden centre and bought it, we finally have one now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She's fast becoming a best seller :) So pleased that you tracked her down guys.

      Delete
  10. Best of luck this time around. I haven't forgotten your generous offer re snowdrops and have been meaning to email you. It's all gone a bit pear shaped around here what with one thing and another, but I will get on to it :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Jessica - luck is most definitely needed.The offer is still there - no rush - they will keep until I hear from you :)

      Delete
  11. Hoping that both them do well for you a second time Anna. I do like both of them but the shape of the flower on Trym is really something isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope that a second attempt will be satisfactory Angie. 'Trym' does indeed have the 'X Factor' when it comes to shape.

      Delete
  12. Hoping the bulbs do well for you....I believe that adage too....after 3 tries I feel accomplished.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Donna. I'm hoping that in this case I will not need a third attempt :)

      Delete
  13. My Galanthus is blooming too. I really should get more varieties. They're so pretty. ... You asked if I've ever been able to get rid of Acanthus mollis. My answer: No. I have tried but there always remains enough that it pops back up. But then I've never persisted. I hope you have been success.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I imagine that they could grew well in your neck of the woods Grace. Thanks for the feedback about acanthus removal.

      Delete
  14. I usually give up on a plant pretty soon - everything gets a "second" chance, but then I have to be tough! I have wasted far too much money over the years on plants that just won't grow for me! The second snowdrop is very unusual. I hope you are lucky and they both get well-established for you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that I could say the same Cathy but have a soft spot for my snowdrops so if needs be there would be one last try! Thanks for your good wishes for their prosperity.

      Delete
  15. I love the blushing beauty, Anna, just delightful! The second one made me laugh...country girl with dirndl perhaps, but the name is not very flattering ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I quite agree Annette with your description and also your comment about the name. I must check out how the name 'Trym' came about but I think it could have been more attractive.

      Delete
  16. That is my philosophy too, I finally admit I can' t grow something if I have killed it three times. Apart from the lovely Edgeworthia chrysantha, I have killed 2 of these, and I think risking a third would be sheer extravagance at the eye- watering price you pay for one for one of theses beauties. Talking of extravagance, these lovely snowdrops are a bit pricey aren' they? Heart- breaking when they disappear. Walrus seems to have disappeared this year and there was a nice big clump last year. I may be begging a bit back when yours gets established. I love Cowhouse Green and Trym They are both beauties. My Trym is just coming out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad to read that you adopt the same maxim too Chloris. Understandable about the edgeworthia. Perhaps somethings are not meant to be. I agree that snowdrops can be a bit pricey but prices depend on where you buy them from and how long you're prepared to wait for prices of the new introductions to drop. Also a girl has to have to some vices :) I would rather treat myself to a couple of new snowdrops than a new top or a bag. It's most upsetting when they disappear. I hope that 'Walrus' recovers if not perhaps I can oblige in a couple of years :)

      Delete
  17. I always admire Trym when I see it as it is so distinctive and I do like to be able to spot the differences.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree with you Helen and am now only buying recognisable 'drops. There are too many that look very similar.

      Delete
  18. Anna, I've been thinking about your snowdrops--they were the first ones that made me fall in love with this sweet little flower. I don't expect to see mine anytime soon so will have to content myself with yours. Fortunately for us, winter here has been relatively mild this year so I have my fingers and toes crossed for an early spring. (Crazy thinking, but who knows!) :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh thanks so much for your lovely comment Garden MS S :) I have wondered what sort of winter you might have had. It sounds as if the weather gods have been benign. Hope that you are not waiting for much longer for your beloved snowdrops to flower.

      Delete
  19. Anna. You need to grab a copy of Gardens Illustrated Feb issue if you don't already have it. Theres 4 or so pages dedicated to a famous victorian galanthophile - worth a read.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks so much Rob for the thought which is much appreciated. I have the magazine - just have to make time for reading it along with the others :)

    ReplyDelete

All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.