Sunday, 15 March 2015

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day ~ March 2015


Giving me greatest pleasure this Bloom Day is crocus tommasinianus 'Whitewell Purple'. The bulbs were planted back on a cool and squally October day in the moss formerly known as our lawn. When I wrote my 'End Of Month View' post in February I was cursing the squirrels as there were only a couple of flowers in evidence. All that hard labour for a paltry showing so I presumed. Since then there have been more showings and although there is not yet a sea of purple on green the foundations are down. As for those bushy tailed creatures perhaps I was too quick to presume that they were the culprits, so I will be offering them a formal apology when they next scarper past. The conclusion is that I was tardy in planting the bulbs, after they had arrived in good time, so this year the plan is to plant more but in September so that they should flower in February. That's the theory anyway but it all depends on me remembering to order them early enough!

As always thanks to Carol over at May Dreams Gardens who hosts this monthly meme which is absolutely fatal when it comes to the wish list.

32 comments:

  1. I do love to see crocuses blooming on a lawn. You've chosen a beautiful variety, I hope they bulk up for you.

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    1. Oh thanks Jo. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that they bulk up as well as hoping that the squirrels do not take a fancy to them.

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  2. Tee hee - we have moss formerly known as lawn too. It may not be squirrels - I think it takes a lot more crocus to get the effect we see and love in public gardens. Fingers crossed yours multiply...

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    1. Yes I think I was too hasty blaming those rats with tails VP :) I realise that patience is required for those drifts that I see in my mind's eye. Now why didn't I make a start twenty years ago I ask myself.

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  3. I have thought of planting some crocuses in our lawn. When can you cut the leaves down?

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    1. Sue, sorry for taking so long in replying to your question about crocuses planted in the lawn. Computer access has been limited recently. I never cut the leaves down from any bulbs after they flower but leave them to die down naturally. I then pick off any tat. My understanding is that you could weaken the following year's flowers if you cut off the leaves. I'm not sure just how long it will take for the leaves to die down but have a feeling that they go quicker than daffodil foliage. To start with I've planted them fairly close to the beech hedge which borders the lawn so we can always leave a strip unmown for a while if needs be. I will keep an eye to see what happens and will let you know memory permitting :)

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  4. I love to see the crocuses blooming! I agree with VP--it takes an awful lot of crocuses to make a large display. I also think they get bigger over time. Happy Bloom Day!

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    1. I know Rose :) I've started in a small way but they can only expand. I will also plant more this autumn.

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  5. Beautiful!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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    1. Thanks for visiting and for your comment Lea :)

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  6. Don't be too kind to the squirrels.. they will take any chance they get!

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    1. I hear you loud and clear Jessica. Maybe I was being a tad hasty offering a public apology. Now what was I thinking of?!

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  7. They do look lovely in a lawn, I think I might try some there as they look so wonderful in the woodland, but will my squirrels be watching me plant them. I've read that we should never place the bulbs on the lawn before planting as the squirrels can smell where they have been. Also to clear any loose outer skins that have come away from the bulbs, never leave them lying around as they are like a beacon saying " come and eat me"!

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    1. I'm sure that I had an invisible audience when I was planting Pauline. Thanks for the tip about the loose outer skirts. Those bits often fall off when you plant and I usually leave them for the elements to dispose off. Never again - I will be there will a fine toothcomb removing all evidence of bulb planting activity!

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  8. One year soon I am going to plant Tommies.

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  9. Lovely! I also always intend to get my bulbs in early but deliveries are often delayed, then the weather doesn't play along, and then it's November! Hope these crocus spread nicely for you. :)

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    1. On this occasion I could only blame myself for not ordering sooner Cathy :)

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  10. You make me realise I should plant some more crocus. My very early yellow did well but later ones were rather sparse.

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    1. Oh Christina I hope that you will rectify the situation come the appropriate time of year for bulb planting :)

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  11. I still blame those bushy tailed creatures here!! I wonder if my C tomms are Whitewell purple and not Barr's purple...must see if I can find an old invoice. They are lovely - especially as mine are mostly over ;)

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    1. Well it's good to have a scapegoat isn't it Cathy and for once I can't blame himself. I wonder if you found that invoice. Mine would have probably been over if I had planted them in September :)

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  12. I've only ever remembered to order bulbs for autumn planting once and that was last year. I buy far more in the green than I should but also find this useful because I can pop the pots in where ever I think needs a dash of colour.
    I could never have the patience to have bulbs in the lawn - I much prefer my lawn cropped short and waiting until later in the year would kill me!

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    1. I think that buying in the green does certainly have its advantages Angie but if you are planting in numbers dormant bulbs are cheaper. As I might have suggested in my post our lawn is far from immaculate so later mowing will not cause me any concern at all :)

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  13. A beautiful crocus, I do like to see them popping up in the garden and in parks and roadside verges, very cheery :)

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    1. Yes Rona they are beautiful wherever they appear and they certainly make me smile.

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  14. Happy to see your lovely crocus...I am hoping the voles left mine alone.

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    1. Voles!!! Maybe I should be grateful for small mercies in the shape of squirrels then Donna :)

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  15. I love crocus but we don't have any lawn now and they don't look as good in the borders against brown soil. I think I might just go for pots next year. :)

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    1. I agree with you WW. They do not always look their best in the ground but they can make a real impact in pots. I do hope that you have some next year.

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  16. I have really fallen for crocus. I put in quite a few bulbs last autumn and like you have drips and drabs of colour rather than a sea. I need to remember to think big! yours is a glorious colour.

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    1. I hope that yours settle and spread well Elizabeth. I think that a crocus sea might take a few years and a good few bulbs to achieve. We'll just have to be patient :)

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.