greentapestry : Tree Following With Lucy ~ March 2015.

Friday, 13 March 2015

Tree Following With Lucy ~ March 2015.


This year's tree is much smaller and younger than last year's willow and is one that we planted in the garden. It's the pear tree 'Doyenne du Comice,' which was introduced into the garden in the autumn of 2011. She was transplanted some twenty feet or so last February - a case of being in the wrong place and happily survived to tell the tale. At the moment she stands at about six feet - the tape measure has not come out but I've stood against her and worked it out that way. I will be interested to see how much she grows over the coming year. I forgot to check her girth so will do that before next month.

There was great excitement last year when she produced her first ever crop. A grand total of three fruits made it to maturity and then disaster struck - they turned mushy before they made it into our mouths. Oh there was much wailing and gnashing of disappointed teeth! As the comedian Eddie Izzard said of pears 'they're gorgeous little beasts, but they're ripe for half an hour, and you are never there. They're like a rock or they're mush". Well that might be exaggerating but I do think that I will have to check them on a daily basis after picking this year. That's of course presuming that I will have a harvest to pick.

As suggested by its name this pear originated in France and it is widely reputed to have the best flavour and texture of any pear. I think it was those character references that sold it to me. It was raised in Angers, France in the 1840s so has now been around for some time. It was apparently introduced to Britain in 1858.  I think that I was so sold on the mouth-watering descriptions of' Doyenne du Comice' that my research stopped at the f word i.e. flavour. Further reading following purchase and planting revealed that she is sterile so a pollination pear partner was introduced the following year which I think is 'Concorde'. Now a third tree Malus 'Red Sentinel' has joined them to add to the blossom effect. The latter which is only a small tree, was only planted last spring so I'm eagerly anticipating its first flowers. 


Only a couple of close-up photos today as the weather has thwarted my plans to take a couple more photos in addition to the ones I took yesterday. It is pouring down out there and from what the forecast is predicting we are in for a cold weekend. However as you can see the leaves are poised ready to break out any day now. Possibly next month will see a pear tree dressed from head to toe in white.

Thanks as always to the lovely Lucy over at 'Loose and Leafy' who enables a veritable parliament of trees from far and wide to get together each month. I'm really looking forward to another year of tree following.

19 comments:

  1. Your tree is turning out to be quite a fascinating subject Anna. Quite fancy some pears now, poached and stewed with porridge is my favourite :)

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    1. Mmmmmm - I have the porridge but no pears at the moment. A most appetising combination. Maybe later this year :)

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  2. What a difference between the two trees, the huge majestic willow you followed last year and this small pear tree which is at the start of its life. I thought that pears were harvested whilst hard and ripened off the tree, just going by what I've heard as I've never grown them myself.

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  3. They are inded quite a contrast Jo.The pears were picked hard and came indoors to ripen but I should have been more active checking their progress. I must have missed a few days and returned to a horror show :( Still a lesson learned for this year.

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  4. I'm with Eddie Izzard, we never catch them at the right time!
    Following this tree will allow you to get all the more familiar with it. We are in for a cold weekend too! I need some heat in my bones now!

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    1. I know that feeling Angie - roll on spring and temperatures in double figures!

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  5. A neighbour gave me a few pears last autumn and they were hard as rocks... for about 24 hours! I had to eat them all at once, but they were so good. I hooe yours produces a few more fruit this year, but the blossom alone will be a treat. Look forward to seeing that!

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    1. It's amazing how quickly they can turn Cathy. I'm looking forward to the blossom which is a treat in itself.

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  6. We often pick pears under -ripe and ripen off the tree.

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    1. That's what I planned to do Sue. I just wasn't diligent enough in checking them daily once they had been picked :( A lesson learned.

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  7. Buds! How wonderful. I hope you have better luck with your crop this year!

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    1. Oh thanks for your good wishes Anna :)

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  8. A lovely tree and I adore the smell of pears ripening.

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    1. Thanks Donna - I will have to remember to smell as well as look this year!

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  9. Did you look it in the eyes, Anna, or did it tower over you...? ;) Big fat buds there - and well done for successfully moving it. I moved 3 no 4 newish fruit trees last year down to the fruit cage and have been inspecting for buds in the last day or two. Definitely some on the pear Concord, so that's a start. Look forward to watching your crop progress

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    1. I will have to get himself standing by the tree as a more accurate yardstick Cathy :) I'm craning my neck slightly to see the top and I'm about five foot six. Fingers crossed that your trees have survived the move. It's rather nerve wracking waiting for buds to reappear.

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  10. Pear trees are lovely when in flower and the fruit is wonderful to eat, you just have to do so very quickly, or preserve them by bottling.

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    1. I think that it will probably be a few years before eating them quickly enough becomes an issue Brian :) Should that scenario happen I think that I will give them to the neighbours or stew any surplus. Mmmmmm - I'm looking forward to that day.

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  11. Pear blossom is so pretty - but I have never brought myself to like the fruit.

    About creatures on the tree. Fellow blogger Esther Montgomery chose to follow an apple tree last year, posted once - then stopped. However . . . in that one post she looked at a bud and found that, when enlarged, the little crinkles in the bark beneath it were not crinkles but scale insect.

    I've been clicking backwards and forwards between her photo and yours - and think there is at least a chance that you have some little creatures there after all.

    See what you think.
    http://esthersgardennotes.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/tree-following-apple.html

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.