greentapestry : Portrait Of A Snowdrop - 'Amy Doncaster'

Wednesday, 12 February 2020

Portrait Of A Snowdrop - 'Amy Doncaster'


Every now and again I attempt to compose a definitive list of my favourite top ten special snowdrops. This is an almost impossible challenge and the list changes slightly each year. Growing in my affections over the last couple of years or so is galanthus plicatus 'Amy Doncaster'. Amy came into my care as a dormant bulb in 2017 if my memory and erratic record keeping serves me right. She was found as a seedling in 1988 in the garden of the plantswoman Amy Doncaster who gardened in Chandler's Ford, Hampshire. She gave it to her friend and fellow galanthophile John Morley of 'North Green Snowdrops' who named it after her. There is also another snowdrop with the name of 'Doncaster's Double Charmer'. If the name sounds familiar there is also a hardy geranium and a ribes speciosum named after Amy.

I'm still struggling to do her justice with a photo. This one was taken on my phone. If you pop over here to the excellent and informative 'Judy's Snowdrops' you can see her both in the shape of a single flower as well as in a sizeable clump. Hopefully mine will reach sizeable clumps size sooner or later.

Amy although not the most vigorous has made reasonable growth since arriving. She was planted out in the garden last winter and looks well. I also have a pot in the greenhouse hopefully containing a spare bulb to share with a friend later this year. This beauty is gently jostling her way into that top ten list.

16 comments:

  1. I can't think of any flower here that inspires the same obsession that snowdrops do in your part of the world, Anna. 'Amy' is lovely, though!

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    1. It must be our winter months that are responsible for such obsessions Kris. You can get out in the garden all year round so have no time to obsess πŸ˜„

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  2. It must be very rewarding to have a plant named after you let alone three,

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    1. It must be a rather state of satisfactory state of affairs Brian. I live in hope πŸ˜‚

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  3. A very speacial lady, love her markings! Snowdrops are so welcome at this time of year and they multiply so easily, what is not to like.

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    1. Yes she is rather special indeed Pauline. I just wish that she would increase at a quicker rate than she does. Hope to see some of your snowdrops soon.

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  4. Very distinctive with the outer petals with their green markings. The way the green darkens on the inner petals then is suddenly edged with clear green looks just like a petticoat peeping under. May she thrive in your garden. May you one day produce an equally stunning new cross.

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    1. Oh I see what you mean about a petticoat effect Noelle πŸ˜ƒ Should I ever produce a special I will sing it from the rooftops before sharing it with my snowdrop friends.

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  5. Snowdrops are tricky subjects to photograph.

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  6. Amy is beautiful - and it's lovely that she also has a story to tell. It's very hard to photographs snowdrops, they're so tiny and they're mostly white - a difficult combination - but you've managed it very well. ��

    PS - I've been unable to comment using my name and url, so I'm using an old google account. But it's Catherine here from notesfrommygarden.com :) With a really old avatar by the looks of it!

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    1. Thanks for visiting Catherine and for your kind comment. So sorry that you had troubles commenting. Sadly it appears that Blogger and Wordpress have longstanding communication problems which do nothing to make life easy for us users.

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  7. I agree it is hard to choose favourite snowdrops when they are all so yummy. But Amy is very beautiful I can see why you love her. And it is a great photo.

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  8. She's a beauty and it looks as if a painter was gently adding the fine green stripes. Yesterday I was also trying to shoot snowdrops I brought back from Spain. The bit on the inside is hardly visible and the markings very faint. Wish I'd knew which species it is.

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    1. Yes I can just see the brush dipping into the watercolours Annette. Your Spanish snowdrop sounds delightful whatever it might be.

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- Anna.