Tuesday, 31 May 2011

End Of Month View ~ May 2011

My May end of month view is from a different part of the garden than I normally feature . I am starting off a border almost from scratch again. The ground cover - a rubus that I allowed himself to plant turned into a monster which swallowed all in its path, so its back to bare earth again apart from a clematis jouiana praecox which resides at one end. Whilst I ponder over a permanent plan for this bed, which is in the only really sunny spot of the garden, I have stuck in some odds and ends. These have been lurking in the cold frame and include some day lilies, a couple of hardy purple leaved geraniums grown from seed, another couple of hardy geraniums, dahlias 'Bishops Children' again grown from seed as well as some penstemons that I took cuttings of last year. There are some verbena bonariensis seedlings waiting on the sidelines until they are big enough to plant. I am also going to plant some allium sphaerocephalon which I planted in pots last autumn. I had intended to transfer the latter from pot to ground yesterday but rain stopped play. This planting will be temporary but will at least give a bit of colour this summer and will be a change from my usual colour palette. Meanwhile there are embroynic plans for more permanent planting - hardy geraniums, osteospernums, alliums, thymes, oereganum and grasses are swirling round in my head. Any other suggestions for sun lovers would be more than welcome. I am rather a shady lady.

The 'End Of Month View' is the idea of The Patient Gardener and is an excellent method of garden recording.

P.S. It is with some disbelief that I report that the fatsia japonica that was lurking in my end of month border has finally been removed. We have replanted it - to say that it is looking sickly is an understatement!

14 comments:

  1. Poor Fatsia! I noticed this morning that mine is looking a little sickly in places, perhaps the drought, not sure. I like the sound of your "temporary" planting. What colour scheme do you want? If I had a sunny border I would be reaching for salvias, iris, possibly verbascum, achillea would make a nice contrast with ferny leaves and flat flower heads. I love the planning stage of a new border, when all is possible. Will enjoy watching it develop. Happy EOMV!

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  2. Always nice to be able to create a new area of planting.Problem is it can fill up way too easily.
    How about Convolvulus cneorum, Libertia, Cistus, Alstroemeria, Sisyrinchium or Potentilla.

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  3. It's nice to have a whole border free as a blank canvas, exciting to be starting from scratch. There's no hope of that here with only one border in the garden which is already full to bursting.

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  4. I have a Black Elder that has been replanted and isn't looking too pleased.

    A new border to plant that sounds exciting. I suppose it depends on whether you want all year interest or for it to peak at t acertain time on what yuo end up planting

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  5. Your border 'wish list' sounds lovely Anna and I second everyone's further ideas for a sunny border.

    I loved your Whodunit post! Vera is very good. We record it and then watch it sans adverts. They drive me to distraction!

    Jeanne
    x

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  6. I love starting new borders from scratch...although it's always a bit daunting, trying to decide what to plant. I wish I had more full sun too! I'm a big fan of Eupatorium (if you have room) grasses (which you mentioned) Agastache, Rudbeckia, Sedum, Nepeta, Persicaria (better with afternoon shade), Echinops, Helenium, Veronicastrum, Knautia, oh, the list goes on and on! Can't wait to see this take shape in the coming months.

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  7. Lovely garden. I replanted a bamboo last year and it is still sulking. I also have sown dahlia bishops children this year, planted them out the other day, just hope the slugs don't notice!

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  8. Hoorah for new bits of garden! Especially when they are populated with the little "leftovers" from other parts of your garden. Enjoy taking your time daydreaming about what you'd like to see there. Although that is advice I hardly ever take myself - I am guilty of moving plants entirely too often.: )

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  9. I like the looks of this border already. I hope the Fatsia recovers.

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  10. It's looking good on the new border Anna - and I find it very reassuring that it's not just me who sticks things in borders as a temporary measure to have summer colour whilst I think about what I really want to do....but is it just me that leaves them there for years once they're in?!

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  11. A bare border is like turning over a new leaf. Trouble is it seems to demand filling before the ideas have set. The cold frame residents should help determine the design, Anna but sun reminds me of salvias, solanums, and helianthus.
    p.s. hope the Fatsia recovers - it's a toughie normally until it dries. Assume yours is not the variegated one which is more precocious

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  12. Anna, sorry about the Fatsia. On the positive a border revamp can be fun. Sometimes I plant temp plants too. How about silver leaves in your border. What about artimesia or sedum :-)

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  13. How lovely to have an empty border to fill! Many of the things I'd suggest for sun have already been mentioned, but you could also look at Papaver orientale, Geum, Echinacea, Anemone coronaria, Pulsatilla, Catanache, Perovskia, Lavandula, more herbs ... the list is pretty endless!

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  14. You could put some catmint in there.

    N. Six hills giant or walkers low bring a splash of blue.

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.