greentapestry : Tree Following With Lucy ~ May 2014

Wednesday, 7 May 2014

Tree Following With Lucy ~ May 2014


What a transformation from the first tentative leaves opening in early April to the full on state of greenness that is my willow today. Today's forecast is for intermittent rain, so photos were taken yesterday just in case. I've decided that the best view of the willow is impeded by the rotary washing line. It was in full flow drying mode yesterday so I will try to remember to temporarily remove it next month. I've nipped out into the garden though today and peered over the stream (the tree is just outside our garden boundary close to a stream) to observe the vegetation. Nettles, cleavers, herb robert and cow parsley definitely have the upper hand. Nearby neighbouring trees a horse chestnut and a hawthorne are both wearing white. I hope that the willow is not envious of their finery.



As well as leaves the willow is now sporting innocent looking catkins as you can see in the photo above. The word' innocent' has been chosen deliberately. An explanation will in due course. Watch this space! 

Writing about my willow has reminded me about a book I bought some time ago. 'Why Willows Weep : Contemporary Tales From The Woods' is a collection of some nineteen short stories by modern authors. The star of each story is a different variety of tree each with their own tale to tell or to be told of. I've written more about this book here and  here.  I'm sure that it would be enjoyed by any tree lover and sales of the book enable The Woodland Trust to plant more trees.

A special thanks to Lucy over at Loose And Leafy who came up with the idea of a tree following meme. You can read all about what a host of other trees are up to this month here.

30 comments:

  1. Wonderful. You wouldn't believe that was the same tree that had such a severe pruning, it's grown back so well. I think these monthly posts will make you more aware of how the tree changes in such a short space of time.

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    1. Yes it's sometimes hard to realise that it's the same tree Jo - well not quite the same but enjoying a new lease of life. The monthly post is certainly encouraging me to look at the tree more closely.

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  2. That's a wonderful specimen Anna - I'm sure the Willow will put it's neighbours to shame soon enough!
    I personally haven't joined in this meme but am really enjoying learning about so many trees that I just wasn't aware off.

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    1. Yes Angie - Lucy certainly come up with a brilliant idea :)

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  3. Your tree has long catkins. The ones on my weeping willow are full of pollen which leaves a nasty scum- like film on the pond.
    I will look out for this book, it sounds interesting.

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    1. I think that you would enjoy the book Chloris.

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  4. What a great meme, Anna. I love the idea and your Willow is a beauty, isn't she? I love the long, dangling stems and leaves. ... Thank you for visiting my blog. I hope you can find that geranium. It seems that usually you lucky folks on that side of the pond get the plants first.

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    1. Thanks for your comment Grace. Sometimes it's the other side of the pond that has new plants well before us :)

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  5. The ever graceful willow, one of my all time favourite trees!

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    1. Graceful is a most most apt descriptive word for my willow for most of the year :) I think that the weeping willow has the edge though when it comes to grace.

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  6. Love all the green freshness of it - the one in our garden had quite a few branches lopped over winter but is sprouting again like a sprouty thing.

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    1. Glad to hear that the lopped branches on your willow are sprouting anew Elaine. It's amazing how they do :)

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  7. What a transformation! It's no wonder some of us find it difficult to connect the winter shapes of trees with their summer selves. Looking forward to hearing more about the catkins.

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    1. That's very true Lucy. I must admit that I find it very difficult to recognise trees when they are not wearing their clothes.

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  8. What a beautiful tree, I love willows, so graceful.

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    1. Thanks for your kind comment Alison :)

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  9. I do love willows, and I don't think your tree has any reason to envy its more flamboyant neighbours, even though hawthorns are a real favourite of mine. The leaves of a willow are hard to beat for simple delicacy, and in the gently swaying habit and you have a graceful tree. Like Lucy I am looking forward to the next installment, and to mention of catkins...

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    1. I think that my willow might just wish for a few flowers now and again Janet :) As you say the leaves are rather special though.

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  10. That is a wonderful willow. I love the fresh greens of this time of year, but those catkins ..... I have a feeling its not going to be good news ...

    Jeanne
    x

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  11. Lovely willow, they look so beautiful with their new leaves. I have a large contorted willow by the fence by the field and it is growing rather large, but thankfully there is plenty of room.
    Are you thinking that all your catkins will make lots of seedlings, or is it the pollen that causes problems?

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    1. Seedlings have not been a problem Pauline but I can say no more until June :)

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  12. Yes, I am intrigued about the catkins....

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    1. I'm afraid that I will have to keep you in suspension Cathy until the next episode :)

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  13. I love that last photo Anna - it makes your willow look like it has a real personality. Now I know where I first heard about that book, which I read and thoroughly enjoyed last year! Thanks!

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    1. Oh thanks for your lovely comment Cathy. So glad to read that you have discovered and enjoyed the book too.

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  14. That willow is beautiful, what a good choice. And how interesting that book sounds, must look it up… (yup. should be weeding. Book sounds much more entertaining!)

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    1. Yes book beats weeding hands down Kate - you can sit under your tree and read it - the tree might enjoy it too.

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  15. how quickly the willow has lushed up Anna - interesting to know what is so innocent about the catkins. Is it a virgin tree I wonder?

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    1. The willow seems to have gone from bare twigs to full on green in the blink of an eyelid. My lips are sealed about the catkins for now :)

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.