Saturday, 9 January 2016

A Flurry Of Snowdrops


There may well be some freezing white precipitation before long but in the meantime there are snowdrops flowering a plenty inside the greenhouse (please excuse the state of the windows, cobwebs etc.). This is part of my small collection of named galanthus, many of which are flowering earlier than usual. There are usually a few that come out early in the new year, some before, but the last couple of months has seen many open before their anointed time. Although the UK has experienced some very mild late autumn/early winter temperatures I think that there are other reasons that might be behind such an early wake-up call, namely :
  • The snowdrops sit outside for a good part of the year but come under cover so that I can appreciate them in the dry and at close quarters. Although there have not been any prolonged cold spells (only one frost to date) which might harm potted bulbs, they came in earlier than usual because it was so wet in November. The pots were oozing moisture so I thought it might be an idea to get them in under cover.
  • Nearly all the snowdrops were repotted whilst they were dormant - not only did they have fresh compost but they were also all treated to a good dollop of leaf mould in each pot. 
  • All my snowdrops were treated to food last year. If only I could remember whether I used tomato food or a seaweed based food!
Anyway early or not I'm not complaining too much, as these little flowers give me so much pleasure and entice me of my January lethargy into the greenhouse. Yesterday saw some new arrivals in the post which hopefully I can share with you soon. In the meantime I would like to celebrate my snowdrop bounty and am kicking off the year with a giveaway. I have a surplus bulb of galanthus plicatus 'Wendy's Gold' which you can see in flower below :


She is a most attractive snowdrop which grows and increases well. The colour of the ovary and the inner markings can vary from a limey - green to a pale golden yellow. 

All you have to do to enter the draw is to comment on this post by the end of Sunday 17th January. Unfortunately I can only post 'Wendy' to UK residents. I will announce the name of the winning recipient as soon as possible after that date. If she comes to live with you she can either continue to live in a pot or be planted in the garden.

45 comments:

  1. Wendy is very pretty, please enter me into the draw. I noticed today I have some snowdrops flowering un my garden, they're nothing special, just some given to me by a neighbour, but they are lovely still.

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    1. Oh your snowdrops are earlier flowering than mine Su and just as special especially as they've come from a neighbour.

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  2. What a fab and generous way to start the year. I have noticed a few signs of snowdrops emerging but no flowers yet. The rain is contributing to my January lethargy, everything's a bit squelchy in the garden and on the plot. Even the leeks look forlorn. I hope it's not too late to wish you Happy New Year. Lou

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    1. Thanks Lou :) It's been good to have a couple of relatively drier and much colder days. I think that your leeks are quite entitled to look forlorn. Happy New Year to you too!

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  3. It must be a real pleasure in your greenhouse right now Anna. It's way too wet here to traipse around the garden to see how many snowdrops are up and about but G. Mrs MacNamara is not too far away so I can enjoy her from the kitchen window.
    I added Wendy's Gold to my collection last year so no need to enter me into your draw Anna. It will improve someone else's odd too :)

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    1. I'm really enjoying my daily excursions to the greenhouse Angie even on cold days like this. It's good to hear that you can gaze at Mrs M. when you're in the kitchen. It must make washing the dishes more pleasurable.

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  4. I love your devotion to the snowdrop. I saw my first sight of a bank full of them the other day and thought of you. Such a simple and beautiful flower which has the honour of being the first bulb to emerge whatever the weather.

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    1. They look too delicate to be such early risers Elaine but their appearance is most deceptive. A bank of snowdrops sounds like a sight for sore eyes.

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  5. It's wonderful when all the snowdrops start flowering again, each day brings new delights. Your greenhouse is looking wonderful with all your beauties opening up. My Wendy's Gold is increasing nicely from the original bulb, so I won't be entering your draw, which will give others a better chance of winning what is a super variety.

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    1. A great time of year Pauline. Wendy does multiply at an encouraging rate even in a pot :)

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  6. Wendy's Gold is an unusual and beautiful specimen, I haven't ventured out to see if any of my snowdrops are appearing, it's either too wet or covered in snow, but I suspect with the recent unseasonal warm weather they are probably not too far away.

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    1. Funnily enough Rona despite the warmth of December my snowdrops in the garden are not really any further ahead than last year. Hope that your weather improves soon for you to venture out there to see what's happening.

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  7. Oh, you have lots of snowdrops flowering already, something to definitely brighten up these dull, dreary days. What a generous giveaway, I'd love to enter please. Wendy's Gold is one of those varieties which has grown on me each time I've set eyes on her, she's very elegant.

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    1. Your name has gone in the pot Jo. She is indeed a most elegant lady.

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  8. Hi Anna and Happy 2016 to you! It's a pleasure to see these delicate beauties!
    Your snowdrops get really good care! Shame on me, I don't have a single snowdrop! I planted them once, and I guess they rotted during our very moist winter. All the best to you and your garden!

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    1. Happy New Year to you Tatyana! I think that it may be some other reason than excessive rain that was responsible for your snowdrop's no show. We get a lot of rain here too over the winter and the snowdrops in the garden usually come through with no problems. Have another go :)

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  9. Oh look at all your beauties, Anna! Isn't it strange how quickly we have accepted how early they are this year? It must be so much easier being able to admire them on the bench in your greenhouse rather than bending down outside - I am certainly appreciating being able to sit on the little wall and inspect mine more closely. In view of our correspondence no need to include me in your draw

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    1. The undercover ones are early Cathy but not those in the garden where they seem to be about the same stage as they were last year. It's good to be able to see the markings more close up than I would otherwise manage. The scent is a bonus too.

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  10. I think it is a wise move to bring them inside, with all the rain we have had, so that you can fully appreciate them Anna. I would imagine, Wendy's Gold would be on any gardeners wish list.

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    1. I think that I made my move at the right time Brian although it was hard work lugging them all indoors to their luxury winter des res accommodation. Wendy is a rather lovely lady and I think that most gardeners would be please to have her in the garden if they do not already have her.

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  11. I have a couple of very common snowdrops that will start blooming this week in the garden. I was surprised today to see their plump white heads dropping towards the earth, ready to open. I had forgotten about them! I do love that you can see yours without having to get on the ground. :o)

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    1. It's not the getting on the ground aspect that I have problems with Sherri - it's the getting up again!

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  12. Wendy is crossing my path regularly and I begin to think it's for a reason. I really like her. Snowdrops are out here too and I wonder what will happen in spring if everything has finished flowering by then. I don't think they fear water-logged soil as they grow happily in very soggy soil in a wood nearby. Have a good week, Anna

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    1. Moist conditions don't seem to upset snowdrops when they are planted in the garden Annette. I'm not sure what our 'spring' is going to be like this year either but it will definitely be different.

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  13. Hello again, Anna - with a blog title of 'a flurry of snowdrops' I hurried over knowing how much you enjoy growing and collecting them! I like the idea of you being able to admire them in your greenhouse and they have extra protection there too. How very generous to to be sharing the very pretty 'Wendy' with your blog followers, I didn't expect that when I was reading down your post - how kind of you :-)

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment Shirley. I'm pleased to share now that I have a surplus. Just wish that there were enough to go around everyone.

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  14. I think you've solved my snowdrop dilemma... as you know I finally dipped my toes into the world of snowdrop collecting last year. I was wondering where to plant them out without the danger of them mingling together into a homegenous lump. I like your way of keeping them in their pots and within a neat tray - I was worried they wouldn't survive if I did that. All I need now are some slightly bigger pots and a neat tray - hurrah :-)

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    1. They do survive VP but do need tlc. I picked the trays up in a local garden centre a few years ago just after Christmas at the bargain price of a £1 per tray! They do though need to be protected though in very cold weather otherwise they can suffer if the pots get frozen as I've found out to my cost :(

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  15. When I see snowdrops I always think of you now Anna, as well as Frank: (https://katob427.wordpress.com/2016/01/11/the-winter-garden-2016/ ) I wonder if you know his blog too.
    Wendy is very pretty with her yellow bodice and petticoat. :)

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    1. Oh thank you Cathy :) I don't know Frank's blog but will pay him a visit soon.

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  16. Hi Anna, While I'm not in the draw, I just wanted to say how much I enjoy seeing your snow drops. They, and the crocuses, are the first things up for me so they hold a special place in my heart. So dainty--and so brave! :)

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    1. Either brave or foolhardy but definitely beautiful :)

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  17. Having snowdrops in a pot is a really good idea, how many bulbs do you put into one pot? Out snowdrops outside are only really just a few inches high at the moment maybe this chilly spell will hold them back.

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    1. Sue, growing in a pot is not recommended by the experts but it can be done. It does require a lot of tender loving care and protection during freezing weather. I start off with one bulb per pot (as seen above) but when they start to multiply I move them on to their own pots. I divide and repot them when they are dormant. I also have a few large pots with several snowdrops in. My snowdrops in the garden are at pretty much the same stage as they were last winter despite December's warmth.

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  18. I am looking forward to seeing what your new ones are. I have bought just one so far this year. It is Diggory, I have been wanting it for ages. I think your idea of growing them in pots is a really good one.

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    1. I think that 'Diggory' is my favourite. The experts suggest that pots are not the best way to grow them but it can be done :)

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  19. How lovely to have them in the greenhouse so that you can see them at close quarters. Mine are only just peeking out of the ground at the moment. But I treated myself to a couple of pots of a double snowdrop the other day. Wendy's Gold looks a beauty, such a great photo. So generous of you.

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    1. It's magical being able to see them close up Annie. That sounds the sort of treat that it would be impossible not to resist :)

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  20. You still have gremlins somewhere Anna. The comment I left here disappeared.

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    1. I think that it was just a temporary absence Chloris but thanks so much for letting me know :)

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  21. You still have gremlins somewhere Anna. The comment I left here disappeared.

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  22. I would love to have Wendy to look after; she a very pretty little thing indeed and it would be great to add to my, albeit, small collection of snowdrops. Thank you anyway for all the very useful advice re nurturing these little plants.

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    1. Thanks for visiting and commenting Alison. I will enter your name in the draw. I'm sure that your small collection will expand - they are addictive :)

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  23. Wendy's Gold is stunning....my snowdrops that were blooming are back under the snow!

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    1. Oh no Donna but at least they will be warm and snug under that blanket of snow. Better snow than ice!

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.