Wednesday, 4 January 2012

The Wind In The Willow

Part of what garden writers refer to as "the borrowed landscape', this willow, which is just outside the boundary of our garden took a nasty battering in yesterday's storms. It looks even worse in the flesh than on the photo and part of the larger damaged branch is dangling ominously near to our shed. It was still dark and lashing it down when I heard a dreadful ominous cracking noise. My first thought was that a tree may have come down across the main road but as I peered out I could see that the traffic was still moving so ruled this out. It was only later in the day when the wind abated that I could get out that this most sad state of affairs met my eyes. A salutary reminder of the power of nature. Now major surgery awaits and as it has proved difficult to establish just who the  the landowner is, I have a feeling that this may be an expensive start to our new year. The lovely Karen from 'An Artist's Garden' tweeted of damage to her polytunnel yesterday and I wonder whether any other UK blogger's gardens were victims of the extreme weather. I do hope that your your good selves, properties and gardens escaped unscathed. This was not our only damage of the day - the force of the wind knocked over himself's parked motorbike which seems a large beast to me. Minor damage done but I was just so mightily relieved that he was not on it as the time.

18 comments:

  1. I have friends that reported extensive damage there due to the storms yesterday, so much so they have a gaping hole in their roof!

    This poor willow, I do hope its surgery is successful and that it rebounds, but those branches look like they've torn the trunks considerably.

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  2. Oh it looks so sad. I dont think Ihave suffered any damage but I am leaving home and returning in the dark so I havent had a real look. My son says there is no damage but the weekend will tell

    Hope it doesnt prove to be too expensive for you

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  3. Hope someone skilled will tidy up the tree for you. A willow should recover? Does look grim and I can imagine the terrible noise!

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  4. That does look bad. We've been having quite a bit of wind here lately. Several years ago we had many of the shingle blow off our roof and cause leaks. Wind is no fun.

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  5. So far here, not too bad. A few fragments of fence heading toward the Land of Oz, but as that fence's days have been numbered for about 18 months, that's no big deal. The original plan for the Christmas and New Year break was to replace it, but that will have to wait until my ankle gets the all clear.

    If any of the back fence goes, we can sneak on to the building site and nab some pallets.

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  6. Wow Anna that does look dramatic! I'd imagine it would look far worse standing beside it too. I bet the tree surgeons are pretty busy at the moment.

    Fingers crossed your shed remains intact. Our shed is providing part of a support for damage to our fence last week. That story I covered in my latest post.

    We lost roof tiles yesterday and are waiting for the roofers to come. It's wild again here tonight. One corner area of roof with damaged tiles (possible hole)could get considerable worse if the wrong angle of wind hits it tonight. Fingers crossed for the wind to die down.

    Oh yes... very lucky himself was not on his bike or even washing it at the time it fell over.

    Wishing you no more damage.

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  7. Hi Anna,

    Sorry to hear about the tree; hopefully it won't cause any damage to your shed in the coming days!

    No damage here that I am aware of, and I don't think any tiles came off but I am tempted to have a look to check anyway.

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  8. Oh Anna - so glad that himself was not on the motor bike. Sad about the willow - but if you can get hold of a skilled tree surgeon all will be well - fingers crossed that it doesn't land on your shed.

    The polytunnel is sadly beyond repair, the fence is currently being propped up and will need new posts and all my windbreaks are broken - but hey - I live on the west coast with the full force of gale force winds and I wouldn't live anywhere else!
    K
    xx

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  9. Sorry to see this. This side of the Atlantic was windy too, but not so much as you. Hope the tree can be rescued. :)

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  10. Such a sad sight, though I'm sure there'll be many more like it around the country after the storms we've had. I hardly slept a wink last night, I was convinced that the roof was about to blow away as the gales were causing such a noise. It's not much better today, the wind's driving the rain.

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  11. I'm just off to check on the polytunnel now, fingers crossed! I do hope the wind calms soon, so many people affected by it.

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  12. A sad sight, Anna. Hope the willow is someone else's tree surgery bill. Looks like a big amputation and worse with your shed in its drop. Pliny's addage is true: a fair and dry Autumn puts the wind in winter. So far only flying furniture in the garden

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  13. Sad to see the damage to the tree but at least no one was hurt. We have fortunately come out of it unscathed. Although a neighbour's monkey puzzle tree has been uprooted. I'm glad I didn't bother buying any cloche tunnels for my allotment though they'd probably be on the other side of the River Severn by now!

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  14. I think anyone who has escaped these winds unscathed is very lucky. My beloved had to go the long way round to work as a tree had come down across the main road. I have had one or two bits of damage but our willow is still standing. Touch wood. The damage on your willow probably looks worse than it is and should be easily remedied I am sure it will re-shoot in no time.

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  15. Poor willow. I expected to see quite a bit of damage and was surprised that all is intact. There was a guy on the radio yesterday to say that we should look on the bright side and that storms as natures way of pruning and disposing of dead and diseased wood, referring us to the hurricane in the 80s which cut swathes through the countryside. Everything recovered considerably quickly. It doesn't help when a loved tree is damaged though does it?

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  16. Wow that's some damage to the willow. Sorry that you have to foot the bill for someone else's tree - hopefully you can track them down at some point for a refund. Definitely better to get it sorted sooner though, seeing as your shed is in the danger zone. No damage here, but lots of plastic pots and tubs strewn around the garden. The chickens seem to have taken it all in their stride.

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  17. It'll recover. Lucky no property was involved.

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  18. Thanks for your lovely new year wishes on my blog the other day, Anna. I'm sorry to hear the year has started so badly for you, but glad that at least no-one was injured. I hope that tree surgery - and bike repairs - don't prove too costly, and that the rest of 2012 treats you much better.

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.