Sunday, 27 June 2010

A Soft Spot



Are there any plants in your garden that you have a soft spot for? In my case this philadelphus is one of them. It was one of the first shrubs that we planted in the garden and has been a sad victim of my lack of discipline when it comes to pruning. It has now reached a substantial height but it is oh so gangly and leggy. Although its flowering period is so brief, when it is covered with a cloud of midummer scent it is definitely worth tolerating its rather drab foliage for the rest of the year. Note to self ~ think about planting either a late or early flowering clematis to climb up it which will perhaps hide some of the limbs ~ maybe even both? Any other suggestions would be welcome.

15 comments:

  1. Anna, I simply adore Phlox pilosa (PPPP), Penstemon calycosus (penstemom X) and the native asters that bloom each fall~Couldn't imagine gardening without them! I wish I knew more about clemmies~I do like the clouds of small white flowers that perfume the garden on the autumn blooming one that is a bit too aggressive here! gail

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  2. Never understood why they call it 'Mock Orange'. It's better than that, whoever 'they' are?

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  3. Hi Anna,

    Is it possible to cut it back gradually to get growth lower down or is this a shrub which really doesn't do well with such treatment?

    Otherwise a Clematis, or perhaps Honeysuckle would be amazing!

    Soft spots... Mmm I have a few but Gaura, Verbena Bonariensis and salvia spring to mind, I seem to have a fair few. But ask me in Spring, Autumn, Winter and I am sure it will change!

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  4. Your philadelphus is gorgeous! I have one which is about twenty years old and it is stunning when in bloom. It took quite a few years of judicious pruning to get it into the nice fountain shape it now has. I have two others which are young and gangly and have yet to produce more than a few blooms. I can only hope they will someday look as good as the first one!

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  5. I have a soft spot for plants that were given to me by other gardeners. That means I love Alchemilla because a friend gave it to me. And I have a soft spot for the Lucy Vitols hosta that came from the same friend.

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  6. Um, I love most of the plants in my garden. Too many soft spots to mention, lol. Do like coral bells, sedum, and campanula of all kinds, but many more. How about a cup and saucer vine (Cobaea scandens)? P.S. England should have gotten that second goal.

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  7. Anna, It's wonderful to be back - and see one of my favorite plants in your post. We have two very large Philadelphus - we selectively prune out the older wood. Love the fragrance!

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  8. Such a lovely shrub! We inherited an overgrown one at our last house and it needed major pruning. Well worth it though as the scent is spectacular. Enjoy!

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  9. Hi Anna, the clemmie idea sounds the perfect solution to humdrum after bloom! How about a mixture of colors, to liven things up a bit? My heart melts at the sight of every single plant, but the deciduous azaleas are the meltingest. :-)
    Frances

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  10. I think a Clematis would look lovely climbing up it. My soft spot is for all the things which self sow in between the paving slabs. I get loads every year from the previous years bedding, and I can never bare to pull them out. I always have to be careful where I'm walking so that I don't stand on them. This year I've got a Mimulus and a Viola, they make me smile when I see them. It's amazing how plants just want to live.

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  11. You can't go wrong with a clematis or a honeysuckle or jasmine perhaps ... I agree, the fragrance is worth the all too brief flowering period!

    Jeanne
    x

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  12. Yes Anna it is a lovely flowering shrub bothe the lime green variety and the ordinary one sorry not sure their names.

    I think you need to go for a clematis that flowers later and needs pruning so that you can also keep the Philadelphus pruned. However we are supposed to prune them when they finnish flowering although I confess I end up doing mine in the Autumn.

    Do watch the really vigorous clematis I have three that grow miles, Alba Luxurians, Blue Belles and Soldertalje. The last one smothers a Victoria Plum and breaks it's branches with the weight, each year I try to head it off in different directions but it still gets the better of me.

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  13. I love Philadelphus! I have a gold leaved one, and it has never been pruned either. I love the idea of a Clematis growing up it. But then, Clematis is a plant I have a very soft and weak spot for.

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  14. I plant Pulmonaria, Brunnera nd ferns around the base of mine, but the top is still lanky. I have another one that has a naturally more rounded and compact shape, Blizzard mockorange. You have to love the pretty blossoms and scent.

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  15. I can understand your soft spot for philadelphus. I took cuttings from the one in my last garden and brought them here as I couldn't bear to leave it behind. They are very beautiful for the few weeks they are in bloom.
    K

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All your comments are much appreciated and treasured. I wil try to reply to everyone who leaves a comment, but it may take me a few days, especially when I start spending more time in the garden and at the lottie. I know that you will understand :) I am sure that I will also visit your blog if I have not already done so. If you have any specific questions I will either reply to them here or you can email me at : thegreentapestry@gmail.com

Namasté

- Anna.